Lundi 22 Mai 2017
( 15/05/13)
MBABANE: Voters began registering for elections in Swaziland, Africa's last absolute monarchy, on Monday with unions and the opposition calling for a boycott of what they dismiss as a "rubber stamp" poll. Authorities expect some 600, 000 eligible voters- slightly more than half of the 1.1 million population - to put their names down for the legislative elections, expected by October.But the country's opposition and unions have rubbished the vote as undemocratic and a mere rubber-stamping of the autocratic rule of King Mswati III. "We call on people not to register but if they can't ... we call on them to peacefully disrupt the vote," said Kenneth Kunene, secretary general of the Communist Party of Swaziland (CPS), one of the...
(Times of swaziland 13/05/13)
EZULWINI – Multiparty democracy should not be forced down the throats of Swazis. This was said by Happy Mahlangu, the newly-appointed South African High Commissioner in the kingdom, in an interview last week. Mahlangu said: “It would be folly to force things on the people of Swaziland. It is the people of Swaziland who should decide whether they want multiparty democracy.” He observed that no outsider was qualified enough to dictate terms on what exactly should happen regarding the contentious issue of multiparty democracy. Optional The high commissioner noted that multiparty democracy was something optional. “I think South Africans have the belief that the best way of representation is multiparties yet that is not the case,” he stated. “They have...
(Reuters (Eng) 26/04/13)
Africa's brisk economic growth over the past decade has been consumer driven, a much-hyped trend that masks the uncomfortable fact that the region remains far too reliant on commodities. Sub-Saharan Africa's growth has been second only to Asia and cracked along at 5.8 percent last year, according to a World Bank estimate, if South Africa, the continent's biggest economy, is excluded. About two-thirds of growth in the past decade has been driven by domestic demand, which has been stoked by a number of factors including the continent's fast-growing and young population. Consumption has had multiplier effects into a range of services including banking and finance. Yet unlike in Asia, Africa's consumer boom has been financed mostly by income generated from...
(Voice of America 25/04/13)
Swaziland’s government is negotiating with public sector workers over wage increase demands in an effort to improve their living conditions, according to a government spokesman. Spokesman Percy Simelane also denied the government spent over three million dollars for the celebration of King Mswati III’s 45th birthday last Friday. “The king’s birthday was privately sponsored this year, as [was] the case was last year,” Simelane said. “The budget for this year’s celebrations and national events was [$1,027,551]. There is just no way that [$3 million] could come from [$1,027,551].” His comments came after public sector workers demanded improved living conditions, saying extravagant nationwide celebrations for the king’s birthday were an indication that the economy had improved. Three years ago, the government...
(Allafrica 04/03/13)
Swaziland's Prime Minister Barnabas Dlamini told newspaper editors that a major achievement of his government was to reduce poverty in the kingdom from 69 percent of the population to 63. But, he was wrong on two counts. First, although he did not reveal this, the statistic comes from a report called Poverty in a Decade of Slow Economic Growth: Swaziland in the 2000s, published in 2011. It looked at what had happened in the previous 10 years. Dlamini's government came into power in 2008, so the report mostly refers to a time before he took office. Second, and more importantly, the reduction in poverty is not at all impressive. The report released by the Swazi Ministry of Economic Planning and...
(Afreeknews 26/02/13)
About 60 armed Swazi police broke up a prayer meeting before it had even started, claiming that the law had been broken. This happened last week (16 February 2013) in a school hall at Salesian in Manzini. Police claimed the people attending were not present for prayers, but had gathered together to plot against national elections due to be held in Swaziland sometime later this year (2013). This, police said, allowed them to break up the meeting without a court order or a warrant. Police spokesperson Inspector Khulani Mamba, said they were acting on information that the prayers were a meeting to plan to disturb forthcoming national elections. 'When we see a crime happening, we don't need a court order,'...

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