Dimanche 20 Août 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 07/07/13)
America's wealthiest universities are venturing into Africa's fast-growing frontier markets in search of outsized investment returns that will allow them to offer scholarships, lure star professors and fund research. For Sub-Saharan Africa, recognition from these deep-pocketed U.S. institutions, who have often earned envy among fellow global investors for their strong returns, marks a significant shift. American university endowments - permanent funds of educational institutions - pride themselves on spotting new investment opportunities early, such as venture capital, private equity and natural resources such as timber. Combined, they manage assets of over $400 billion. A study of 831 endowments by the Commonfund Institute and the National Association of College and University Business Officers published this year showed their annual net returns...
(The Associated Press 06/07/13)
There was no official update Saturday morning on the condition of the 94-year-old former president, who is in critical but stable condition after being diagnosed with a recurring lung infection. He was taken to a hospital in Pretoria, the capital, on June 8. The government has said Mandela is not in a vegetative state, contrary to recent court documents. A close friend told Sky News that the anti-apartheid leader was conscious and responsive earlier this week. There has been an outpouring of concern in South Africa and around the world for Mandela, a transformative figure who led the tense shift from white rule to democracy two decades ago in a spirit of reconciliation.
(Swazi Media Commentary 04/07/13)
Today (4 July 2013), Africa Contact launched an ACT NOW campaign to unban Swazi trade union federation, TUCOSWA, together with the Congress of South African Trade Unions and TUCOSWA, writes Kenoworthy News Media. “With this campaign, we wish to send a clear message to Swaziland’s government in general, and its Minister of Labour in particular, that the Swazi trade unions have the support of people throughout the world, who will not stand idly by and let the rights of workers in Swaziland be trampled underfoot,” says Africa Contact’s Chairperson, Mads Barbesgaard. “Together with the ILO we demand that TUCOSWA is unbanned. TUCOSWA’s struggle is essential and epoch-making in ensuring that leaders in other countries are not inspired by Swaziland to...
(Times of swaziland 17/06/13)
MBABANE – There is growing division among members of the public sector unions on the five per cent salary raise offered by government. Public sector unions’ leaders have been inundated with calls from some civil servants calling on their leaders to sign government’s offer. The public sector unions are: the Swaziland National Association of Teachers (SNAT), the Swaziland Democratic Nurses Union (SWADNU), the National Public Service and Allied Workers Union (NAPSAWU) and the Swaziland National Association of Government Accounting Personnel (SNAGAP). The fears were triggered by the threats made by the Government Negotiating Team (GNT) on Wednesday last week, as reported by this publication on Friday. Some of the unions’ leaders confirmed that they were receiving endless calls following the...
(Swazi Media Commentary 14/06/13)
A demand by a chief in Swaziland that his subjects pay him E5,000 (more than two years’ income for some of his people) as a ‘tribute’ highlights the power chiefs have over people in the kingdom of the autocratic King Mswati III. Chief Mshikashika Ngcamphalala, of Kangcamphalala, is reported to have demanded the money from sugar cane farmers in his chiefdom. He is demanding ‘setfulo’, which traditionally are tributes paid to the chief a person pays allegiance to. The Times of Swaziland reported that he is demanding the money from 18 sugar cane farming schemes and he stands to collect E90,000 in total. The paper reported that people in the area said, ‘members of the sugar cane associations were tentatively...
(The Associated Press 11/06/13)
JOHANNESBURG — The desk is spotless and books neatly line the shelves in Nelson Mandela's office at a Johannesburg-based foundation that carries his name, but the former South African president and anti-apartheid leader hasn't worked there for years. The meticulously preserved room is one of many tributes to the legacy of a former prisoner who became so revered for his efforts to reconcile a racially divided nation that many South Africans cannot bring themselves to speak openly about the possibility of his death. That reluctance is gradually eroding as the 94-year-old receives treatment for a recurring lung infection, spending a fourth day in a Pretoria hospital on Tuesday. President Jacob Zuma called Mandela's condition "very serious" but said he has...
(AFP (eng) 11/06/13)
JOHANNESBURG, June 11, 2013 (AFP) - Nelson Mandela was spending his fourth day in hospital Tuesday where he was being treated in intensive care for a lung infection. The 94-year-old former president was rushed to a Pretoria hospital early Saturday and was said to be in serious but stable condition. His latest health scare has been met with prayers and a growing acceptance among South Africans that their hero may be nearing the end of his life. "He is receiving intensive care treatment," presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj, who served jail time with Mandela, told AFP on Monday. He "remains in hospital, and his condition is unchanged," the presidency said after describing him as being in a "serious but stable" condition...
(Times of swaziland 10/06/13)
KANGCAMPHALALA – Sugar cane farmers in the area are disgruntled that their Chief, Mshikashika Ngcamphalala, is demanding tribute of E5 000 (setfulo) per scheme. Setfulo is the tribute that is paid to the chief one pays allegiance to. The chiefdom has about 18 sugar cane farming schemes and each is allegedly expected to pay E5 000. This totals to E90 000 which the schemes are due to pay to the chief for their allegiance. Ironically, sources in the area said members of the sugar cane associations were tentatively earning around E2 000 a year each on average. The chief has, through his inner council, sent letters to the various sugar cane schemes in the area, reminding them to pay the...
(Times of swaziland 07/06/13)
MANZINI – Members of the public will pay E1 extra to purchase ai-rtime from vendors popularly known as Bizemoyeni. This will be as a result of MTN Swaziland’s decision to reduce the commission it pays to airtime vendors. Information which this company has in its possession is to the effect that the airtime vendors have rejected MTN Swazi-land’s decision to drop the commission from six per cent to five per cent. The company has indicated this will take effect come July 1, 2013.The Swaziland MTN Vendors Association (SMVA) executive committee, on Tuesday, met MTN officials who are reported to have been sent to inform the vendors about the decision. Information sourced from an inside source is to the effect that...
(Times of swaziland 06/06/13)
MBABANE - The three soldiers who are suing the USDF for E12 million for alleged unfair dismissal were actually fired by His Majesty King Mswati III. USDF is an acronym for the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force. The three Privates, Nkosikayikhethi Nxumalo, Vusi Hlatjwako and Mpendulo Mngomezulu now want to be compensated with over E12 million by the force. In a responding affidavit, Major General Jeffery Tshabalala stated that the High Court has no jurisdiction to hear the matter. “I state that the applicants are giving this honourable court half-truths as they know very well that the reason why they are no longer members of the Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force is because they were dismissed by the Commander- in-Chief of the...
(Swazi Observer 01/06/13)
Former Agriculture Minister Hezekiel Sipho Mamba is battling to regain ownership of a farm in Kubuta, which he lost as a result of SwaziBank’s crisis during the infamous grab-a-cow exercise of the mid 90s. This is in respect of a personal loan he acquired in 1992 from government through the then Swaziland Development and Savings Bank. However, this later cascaded into a long legal battle whereby the bank has not been able to furnish him with statements about how he used up the loan to which the farm was listed as security under questionable circumstances. facility Mamba says he was approached by a top bank official in 1991 to sign for the housing loan under the ministerial facility but said...
(Times of swaziland 31/05/13)
MBABANE - Even though the country re-launched the Investor Road Map and started its implementation, the overall unconducive investment climate poses challenges to growth, alongside persistent skills shortages and mismatches, the AfDB has noted. This is reflected in a press statement issued by the African Press Organisation on behalf of the African Development Bank (AfDB).However, the AfDB expects the country’s fiscal situation to slighltly stabilise. “While the fiscal situation in 2013/14 is likely to stabilise, underlining structural bottlenecks will need to be addressed in order to achieve high and sustainable growth. These problems also highlight the risk of the worsening of already weak social indicators and a possible reversal of the poverty gains made before the fiscal crisis, when poverty...
(Times of swaziland 31/05/13)
Sir, I am directing my comments towards the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, concerning his outbursts on the purported planned visits by South African MPs. Quite frankly, I do not understand your fears, bitterness and anger, Mr Minister. Quite often, together with Percy Simelane, you keep on telling the world that people outside the country talk negatively about our country because they get the wrong information from third parties. The very same MPs have resolved to physically come over to Swaziland to assess the real political, economic and social situation, without relying on third parties’ stories. You somersault again and say they are crazy and will be prevented. Why now? I wonder why the dilly-dallying now. If these people...
( 15/05/13)
MBABANE: Voters began registering for elections in Swaziland, Africa's last absolute monarchy, on Monday with unions and the opposition calling for a boycott of what they dismiss as a "rubber stamp" poll. Authorities expect some 600, 000 eligible voters- slightly more than half of the 1.1 million population - to put their names down for the legislative elections, expected by October.But the country's opposition and unions have rubbished the vote as undemocratic and a mere rubber-stamping of the autocratic rule of King Mswati III. "We call on people not to register but if they can't ... we call on them to peacefully disrupt the vote," said Kenneth Kunene, secretary general of the Communist Party of Swaziland (CPS), one of the...
(Times of swaziland 13/05/13)
EZULWINI – Multiparty democracy should not be forced down the throats of Swazis. This was said by Happy Mahlangu, the newly-appointed South African High Commissioner in the kingdom, in an interview last week. Mahlangu said: “It would be folly to force things on the people of Swaziland. It is the people of Swaziland who should decide whether they want multiparty democracy.” He observed that no outsider was qualified enough to dictate terms on what exactly should happen regarding the contentious issue of multiparty democracy. Optional The high commissioner noted that multiparty democracy was something optional. “I think South Africans have the belief that the best way of representation is multiparties yet that is not the case,” he stated. “They have...
(Reuters (Eng) 26/04/13)
Africa's brisk economic growth over the past decade has been consumer driven, a much-hyped trend that masks the uncomfortable fact that the region remains far too reliant on commodities. Sub-Saharan Africa's growth has been second only to Asia and cracked along at 5.8 percent last year, according to a World Bank estimate, if South Africa, the continent's biggest economy, is excluded. About two-thirds of growth in the past decade has been driven by domestic demand, which has been stoked by a number of factors including the continent's fast-growing and young population. Consumption has had multiplier effects into a range of services including banking and finance. Yet unlike in Asia, Africa's consumer boom has been financed mostly by income generated from...
(Voice of America 25/04/13)
Swaziland’s government is negotiating with public sector workers over wage increase demands in an effort to improve their living conditions, according to a government spokesman. Spokesman Percy Simelane also denied the government spent over three million dollars for the celebration of King Mswati III’s 45th birthday last Friday. “The king’s birthday was privately sponsored this year, as [was] the case was last year,” Simelane said. “The budget for this year’s celebrations and national events was [$1,027,551]. There is just no way that [$3 million] could come from [$1,027,551].” His comments came after public sector workers demanded improved living conditions, saying extravagant nationwide celebrations for the king’s birthday were an indication that the economy had improved. Three years ago, the government...
(Allafrica 04/03/13)
Swaziland's Prime Minister Barnabas Dlamini told newspaper editors that a major achievement of his government was to reduce poverty in the kingdom from 69 percent of the population to 63. But, he was wrong on two counts. First, although he did not reveal this, the statistic comes from a report called Poverty in a Decade of Slow Economic Growth: Swaziland in the 2000s, published in 2011. It looked at what had happened in the previous 10 years. Dlamini's government came into power in 2008, so the report mostly refers to a time before he took office. Second, and more importantly, the reduction in poverty is not at all impressive. The report released by the Swazi Ministry of Economic Planning and...
(Afreeknews 26/02/13)
About 60 armed Swazi police broke up a prayer meeting before it had even started, claiming that the law had been broken. This happened last week (16 February 2013) in a school hall at Salesian in Manzini. Police claimed the people attending were not present for prayers, but had gathered together to plot against national elections due to be held in Swaziland sometime later this year (2013). This, police said, allowed them to break up the meeting without a court order or a warrant. Police spokesperson Inspector Khulani Mamba, said they were acting on information that the prayers were a meeting to plan to disturb forthcoming national elections. 'When we see a crime happening, we don't need a court order,'...

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