Dimanche 22 Octobre 2017
(Afrik.com 18/07/13)
Le palais somptueux de l’ex-Guide va être bientôt transformé en parc d’attraction, a annoncé mercredi le ministre libyen du Tourisme. Le terrain de plusieurs hectares avait été rasé par les bombardements de l’Otan puis les assauts des rebelles. Un Kadhafiland devrait bientôt voir le jour en Libye. Le parc d’attraction sera construit à la place du Bab Al-Aziziya, la résidence de Mouammar Kadhafi, qui se situe au cœur de Tripoli, la capitale libyenne, a annoncé le ministre libyen du Tourisme. Le palais du défunt leader libyen tué à Syrte, sa ville natale, en octobre 2011, avait été rasé suite aux bombardements de l’Otan suivi des assauts répétés des rebelles qui avaient atteint la capitale, Tripoli. Jadis somptueux, le palais aujourd’hui...
(Le Soleil 18/07/13)
La Commission économique pour l’Afrique (Cea) en collaboration avec Oxford University Press, a publié la 3ème édition du Rapport sur la gouvernance en Afrique (Agr III). «Alors que l'Afrique a enregistré des progrès remarquables dans la régularité des élections, le contenu et la qualité de ces élections demeurent suspects dans de nombreux pays. Les élections sont devenues source de conflits avec la violence, les tensions et les acrimonies et les divisions d'élite pointue qui retardent les résultats des élections. Ceci constitue une tendance préoccupante à l'avenir démocratique de l'Afrique », lit-on dans le communiqué. Ce rapport retrace la généalogie des élections en Afrique; les infrastructures politiques et constitutionnelles sur lesquelles les élections sont faites, les formes de transition politique par...
(L'Expression (alg) 17/07/13)
Les autorités algériennes affirment qu'un groupe armé de 30 terroristes envisage d'attaquer les intérêts français, américains et algériens dans la région du Sahel. Selon la radio privée tunisienne, «Mosaïque FM», l'Algérie aurait envoyé des messages aux responsables de la sécurité en Tunisie et en Libye, leur demandant de maintenir le niveau élevé de surveillance des frontières entre leur pays et l'Algérie. Les autorités algériennes affirmant avoir reçu des informations sur la constitution d'un nouveau groupe armé constitué de 30 terroristes appartenant au bataillon, «Les signataires par le sang» et qu'ils envisagent d'effectuer des attaques contre les intérêts français, américains et algériens dans la région du Sahel. La radio tunisienne a également indiqué toujours selon des sources algériennes impliquées dans le...
(Reuters (Eng) 17/07/13)
TRIPOLI — Moammar Gadhafi's Tripoli compound, the city within a city from which he orchestrated eccentric defiance of Western powers and disdain for his own people for four decades, is to be turned into a public park, Tourism Minister Ikram Abdusalam Bash Imam said on Tuesday. The sprawling six-sq-km (2.5-sq-mile) Bab al-Aziziya complex once housed a swimming pool, sports pitches, senior officials' villas and gardens as well as an underground bunker, government offices and buildings belonging to the feared and pervasive security apparatus. Some residents recall how they were too scared to look at it when they drove past to avoid harassment by security agents. But the revolution that toppled Gadhafi reduced it to rubble. “We will soon start moving...
(The Daily Star 10/07/13)
Since the overthrow of Moammar Gadhafi in 2011, Libya’s oil industry has become the target of violent attacks and civil protests. The latest challenge is a lack of electricity. Production dropped 16 percent to 1.13 million barrels a day last month, the lowest since January, to data compiled by Bloomberg. The decline is partly because power shortages are disrupting the pumps that lift oil from beneath the ground, said Abdul-Jalil Mayuf, a spokesman for state-run Arabian Gulf Oil Co., which pumps crude in eastern Libya. The oil and natural gas industry makes up more than 70 percent of Libya’s economy and generates almost all the state’s revenue, according to the International Monetary Fund. Falling output is also a challenge for...
(Bloomberg 09/07/13)
Since the overthrow of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, Libya’s oil industry has become the target of violent attacks and civil protests. The latest challenge is a lack of electricity. Production dropped 16 percent to 1.13 million barrels a day last month, the lowest since January, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The decline is partly because power shortages are disrupting the pumps that lift oil from beneath the ground, said Abdel Jalil Mayuf, a spokesman for state-run Arabian Gulf Oil Co., which pumps crude in eastern Libya. The oil and natural gas industry makes up more than 70 percent of Libya’s economy and generates almost all the state’s revenue, according to the International Monetary Fund. Falling output is also a...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/07/13)
(Reuters) - An agreement has been reached with security guards who had shut down two oil ports in eastern Libya, allowing exports to resume, an official present at the negotiations said on Sunday. Members of the security forces guarding Es Sider and Ras Lanuf ports had shut them down in the last few days after they demanded better work conditions, said Saad Benshrada, a member of the energy committee within Libya's national assembly. Es Sider, Libya's main crude oil export terminal, was shut down on Thursday night, while Ras Lanuf port was closed soon after, oil industry sources said. "There was a meeting in Brega between representatives of the groups that closed down the ports, the oil ministry and others,"...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/07/13)
America's wealthiest universities are venturing into Africa's fast-growing frontier markets in search of outsized investment returns that will allow them to offer scholarships, lure star professors and fund research. For Sub-Saharan Africa, recognition from these deep-pocketed U.S. institutions, who have often earned envy among fellow global investors for their strong returns, marks a significant shift. American university endowments - permanent funds of educational institutions - pride themselves on spotting new investment opportunities early, such as venture capital, private equity and natural resources such as timber. Combined, they manage assets of over $400 billion. A study of 831 endowments by the Commonfund Institute and the National Association of College and University Business Officers published this year showed their annual net returns...
(The Associated Press 06/07/13)
There was no official update Saturday morning on the condition of the 94-year-old former president, who is in critical but stable condition after being diagnosed with a recurring lung infection. He was taken to a hospital in Pretoria, the capital, on June 8. The government has said Mandela is not in a vegetative state, contrary to recent court documents. A close friend told Sky News that the anti-apartheid leader was conscious and responsive earlier this week. There has been an outpouring of concern in South Africa and around the world for Mandela, a transformative figure who led the tense shift from white rule to democracy two decades ago in a spirit of reconciliation.
(Libya Herald 03/07/13)
Over 40 individuals representing 30 companies and organisations either interested or already working in Libya, met at The Hague on 25 June for a roundtable conference, chaired by former Dutch deputy Prime Minister professor Laurens Jan Brinkhorst. The Dutch ambassador to Tripoli as well as the Libyan Chargé d’Affaires to the Netherlands and representatives from the Dutch Foreign Ministry were also present. Although the conference was held behind closed doors without any media present, it was agreed that Libya Herald could publish some general outcomes of the this meeting. The conference was organised by Herman Klijnsma head of the Dutch Libyan Cooperation Council (DLCC), and was the third meeting since 2011. The companies and organisations present represented the shipping/transport/logistics, medical,...
(Hrw 19/06/13)
From tragedy can come positive change. The Libyan government has that chance, after violent clashes last week between a militia and residents of Benghazi left 32 people dead. The government should use the incident to devise a clear plan for security sector-reform and to clamp down on the country’s many illegal armed groups. The violence began on June 8, when Benghazi residents, angry at abusive militia conduct, protested at the base of one of the city’s largest armed groups, Libya Shield 1. The dispute escalated, witnesses said, after protesters hurled stones. The militia opened fire with high-calibre weapons and anti-aircraft guns. Hospital sources said that only two of the dead came from Libya Shield. The army’s special forces, under government...
(Magharebia(en) 14/06/13)
Tripoli — Last week-end's bloody attack on anti-militia protesters in Benghazi stirred a large debate about the role of the military in a country that has been suffering from security turmoil since the fall of the Kadhafi regime. Militias will have to either lay down their arms or join the army by the end of the year, Tripoli Post quoted Libya's new chief of staff, Col. Salem al-Gnaidy, as saying on Wednesday (June 12th). Al-Gnaidy's demand was issued after last Saturday's deadly fighting in Benghazi between protesters and the Libya Shield militia that left 31 dead and at least 70 injured. Fighting erupted after some 200 demonstrators tried to dislodge the "Libya Shield" First Brigade (Deraa 1) from its barracks...
(New Vision 12/06/13)
BENGHAZI - The new head of Libya's military on Tuesday called on armed groups to put themselves under the command of the national army, after clashes in which 31 people were killed, adding that patience was running out with the independent militias. Fighting broke out on Saturday at the headquarters of the Libya Shield militia in the eastern city of Benghazi when the group's gunmen clashed with protesters demanded the disbanding of militias, and with troops. Several soldiers and protesters were among the dead. "We welcome any force want to join the army and we are ready to pay bonuses to those who hand over weapons," Salem al-Gnaidy, who became army chief of staff on Sunday, told a news conference...
(Libya Herald 12/06/13)
The much anticipated vote for a new president of the General National Congress (GNC) to replace Mohamed Magarief has been postponed to 16 June because of the Benghazi shootings last Saturday which claimed 31 lives and injured dozens more. The announcement by the Office of the Presidency of Congress of three days of national mourning for those who died, which ends today, was one of the factors in delaying the vote, according to officials. Another was the fact that several Benghazi and eastern region Congress members are preoccupied with developments related to the tragedy. Magarief resigned on 28 May ahead of being forced out of office by the Political Isolation Law (PIL), which officially came into effect on 5 June,...
(The Associated Press 11/06/13)
JOHANNESBURG — The desk is spotless and books neatly line the shelves in Nelson Mandela's office at a Johannesburg-based foundation that carries his name, but the former South African president and anti-apartheid leader hasn't worked there for years. The meticulously preserved room is one of many tributes to the legacy of a former prisoner who became so revered for his efforts to reconcile a racially divided nation that many South Africans cannot bring themselves to speak openly about the possibility of his death. That reluctance is gradually eroding as the 94-year-old receives treatment for a recurring lung infection, spending a fourth day in a Pretoria hospital on Tuesday. President Jacob Zuma called Mandela's condition "very serious" but said he has...
(Magharebia(en) 11/06/13)
Libyan Army Chief of Staff Youssef al-Mangoush resigned on Sunday (June 9th), a day after violent militia clashes in Benghazi left 31 people dead and a hundred wounded. Fighting erupted on Saturday when hundreds of demonstrators tried to dislodge the First Libya Shield Brigade from its Benghazi barracks. The anti-militia protestors encircled the brigade headquarters, called for it to disband and for regular security forces to step in. Before resigning, al-Mangoush condemned the violence and announced that the four Libya Shield brigades in Benghazi would become army units, Libya Herald reported. Col. Abdallah al-Shaafi, spokesperson for Benghazi joint security room, said that the first battalion of Special Forces now controlled the headquarters of the Libya Shield Brigade after it moved...
(The New York Times 11/06/13)
TWO years after the Libyan revolution, the police and army remain weak and hollow. Neglected by Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi in favor of more loyal units commanded by his sons, they are ill-equipped, understaffed, bloated at the senior ranks and tainted by their association with the old regime. Into their place have stepped the country’s 300 revolutionary militias — the groups that fought in the 2011 revolution that overthrew Colonel Qaddafi or arose in its. On Saturday, throngs of protesters in Benghazi stormed the headquarters of a government-sponsored militia, Libya Shield, whose members opened fire, killing at least 27 people. Weary of Libya Shield’s overbearing presence, the crowds had demanded that the regular army and police take its place. It was...
(AFP (eng) 11/06/13)
JOHANNESBURG, June 11, 2013 (AFP) - Nelson Mandela was spending his fourth day in hospital Tuesday where he was being treated in intensive care for a lung infection. The 94-year-old former president was rushed to a Pretoria hospital early Saturday and was said to be in serious but stable condition. His latest health scare has been met with prayers and a growing acceptance among South Africans that their hero may be nearing the end of his life. "He is receiving intensive care treatment," presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj, who served jail time with Mandela, told AFP on Monday. He "remains in hospital, and his condition is unchanged," the presidency said after describing him as being in a "serious but stable" condition...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/06/13)
AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - The lawyer for Libya's former spy chief Abdullah al-Senussi has demanded his surrender to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, where he would not face the threat of the death penalty. Senussi, notorious as right-hand man to slain Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, is wanted by the ICC on charges of ordering brutal reprisals during the uprising that toppled the Libyan strongman in 2011. But in Libya, where he is associated with 1996 massacre of more than 1,200 prisoners in Tripoli's Abu Salim prison, authorities have been reluctant to surrender him, saying they can give him as fair a trial as the Hague-based court. Senussi's lawyer, Ben Emmerson, rejected that assertion. "For nine months," Emmerson told...
(The Tripoli Post 06/06/13)
Tripoli— The government of Ali Zidan has issued Wednesday a decree whereby the headquarters of four major institutions will be moved out of the capital Tripoli to the second major city of Benghazi in eastern Libya. The institutions include the National Oil Corporation (NOC), the Libyan Airlines, Libyan Insurance Company and National Investment Company. The move comes within the decentralization policy many Libyans have been calling for it, especially in the eastern region. Prime Minister Zidan denied that the decision was made because of a mounting pressure from the eastern region and said wherever a headquarter of an organization or a corporation may be located, it will always be serving the interests of the whole Libya wherever they may be...

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