| Africatime
Vendredi 28 Avril 2017
(AFP (eng) 11/06/13)
JOHANNESBURG, June 11, 2013 (AFP) - Nelson Mandela was spending his fourth day in hospital Tuesday where he was being treated in intensive care for a lung infection. The 94-year-old former president was rushed to a Pretoria hospital early Saturday and was said to be in serious but stable condition. His latest health scare has been met with prayers and a growing acceptance among South Africans that their hero may be nearing the end of his life. "He is receiving intensive care treatment," presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj, who served jail time with Mandela, told AFP on Monday. He "remains in hospital, and his condition is unchanged," the presidency said after describing him as being in a "serious but stable" condition...
(Front Page Africa Online 10/06/13)
Monrovia - The human resource manager of the Chongqing International Construction Company,(CICO) has refuted recent media reports of bad labor practice allegedly being carried out by the company. Ms. Jacqueline Sogbandi says the company is currently paying workers far above the minimum wage set by the government. A Labor law crafted 35 years ago by the Liberian government provides that a person be paid 0.25 cents per hour. Madam Sogbandi said, CICO employees are receiving medical and transportation incentives contrary to rumors that the company is paying peanuts. Sogbandi said, CICO remains focus on constructing highly standardized road network in post-war Liberia. Madam Sogbandi also described as “false and misleading “of a recent report in a local daily that CICO...
(The News 07/06/13)
The Management of the Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC) says its attention has been drawn to a publication carried in the Tuesday, June 4, 2013 edition of the CORRUPTION WATCH NEWSPAPER with a front page banner headline story entitled: “Ellen’s Millionaire Club Swells” DMD/O speaks of wealth (Part I). According to the Public Relations office, LPRC management explained that the writer of the story claimed that LPRC DMD for Operation, Aaron J. Wheagar, admitted being the “youngest richest” Operations Manager at the entity, among others. LPRC said the paper misrepresented the facts and has allegedly engaged in a smear campaign to blackmail Mr. Wheagar. The company further alleged that the paper’s publication was predicated upon the DMD/O refusal to give...
(Front Page Africa Online 03/06/13)
The human resource manager of the Chongqing International Construction Company,(CICO) has refuted recent media reports of bad labor practice allegedly being carried out by the company. Ms. Jacqueline Sogbandi says the company is currently paying workers far above the minimum wage set by the government. A Labor law crafted 35 years ago by the Liberian government provides that a person be paid 0.25 cents per hour. Madam Sogbandi said, CICO employees are receiving medical and transportation incentives contrary to rumors that the company is paying peanuts. Sogbandi said, CICO remains focus on constructing highly standardized road network in post-war Liberia. Madam Sogbandi also described as "false and misleading "of a recent report in a local daily that CICO told the...
(The News 23/05/13)
The latest assets declaration report released by the Liberia Anti-Corruption Commission (LACC) on the verification of public officials' assets has exposed several officials who allegedly refused to allow their assets [already declared] to be verified by the LACC. The verification process by the LACC was intended to show the truthfulness of the assets that have been declared by officials of government. The new strategy by the LACC is intended to fully vet, verify and certify the truthfulness of the assets declared by these officials as demanded by President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. The report, released to the public on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, pinpointed several officials who are alleged to have refused their assets to be verified. According to the LACC, those...
(Reuters (Eng) 26/04/13)
Africa's brisk economic growth over the past decade has been consumer driven, a much-hyped trend that masks the uncomfortable fact that the region remains far too reliant on commodities. Sub-Saharan Africa's growth has been second only to Asia and cracked along at 5.8 percent last year, according to a World Bank estimate, if South Africa, the continent's biggest economy, is excluded. About two-thirds of growth in the past decade has been driven by domestic demand, which has been stoked by a number of factors including the continent's fast-growing and young population. Consumption has had multiplier effects into a range of services including banking and finance. Yet unlike in Asia, Africa's consumer boom has been financed mostly by income generated from...

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